Monday, December 15, 2008

HARTE 101 - THE ROOTS OF HIP HOP

HARTE 101 - ROOTS OF HIP HOP

Hip Hop did not develop in a vacuum- it´s roots can be traced back to the earliest Afro-American music, and the folks who were influenced by these sounds along the way. This CD compiles some of the great recordings that showcase the spoken word and street culture put forth from the 1920´s through the 1960´s that would go on to influence the entire rap music genre. The themes will be familiar- religion, politics, Black experience, badass gangsta rap, speed, sex, drugs and rock n´ roll.
Let´s listen to the lessons that the hipsters of the past taught the rappers of today.











HR 101 - ROOTS OF HIP HOP - LP







HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE AMAZING REVIEWS COMING IN FOR THIS!!!

Rolling Stone: 3.5of 5 Stars Average User Rating: 4of 5 Stars
It's not the first hip-hop archaeological dig (see Yazoo's The Roots of Rap, for one). But This mix of proto-rap testifying, trash-talking and gibberish from the Twenties to the Sixties may be the most far-ranging [hip-hop archaeological dig]. The 1952 novelty "Hambone" combines nursery rhymes with thigh slaps and cheek pops that would impress Biz Markie, and when Joe Hill Louis hollers, "We'll all gotta go to jail," on the raw, rabble-rousing 1950 blues "Gotta Let You Go," dude's utterly gangsta. And even when connections seem stretched, the liner notes make the logic amusing: Any set trying to link the Rev. J.M. Gates with N.W.A and Harmonica Frank Floyd with Kid Rock is definitely history worth hearing.
- WILL HERMES, Rolling Stone, Jan 22, 2009


Sex, gambling, drugs and hard times didn’t exactly arrive with hip-hop; neither did rhyming and boasting.
…A shrewdly chosen collection of old songs and recitations. Culled from odd corners of Americana, ranging from the 1930s to the late 1950s, it includes sermons, talking blues, R&B, hipster jive and a prison-yard rhyme.
And it’s also full of finds, like the raspy-voiced swing-band gospel of “In Dat Mornin’ ” by Jimmie Lunceford and His Chickasaw Syncopators and the bluesy murder-suicide (with scream and gunshots) of Little Caesar’s “Goodbye Baby.” Hip-hop hindsight embraces them all.
-Jon Pareles, New York Times, January 9, 2009

When considering the origins of hip-hop, few look past the Sugar Hill Records era or the Bronx block parties of the ’70s. But the relatively unknown Harte label is attempting to broaden the discussion with The Roots of Hip Hop.
To Harte’s credit, at times you can clearly hear the influence that has been passed on to MCs, as on the Soul Stirrers’ politically driven “Why I Like Roosevelt (Parts 1 and 2),” and the badass chick braggadocio of “Hot Mama” by Brother Woodman & The Chanters featuring Ethel Brown.
-Max Herman XLR8R January 9 2009

Track Listing: CD Track Listing:

Katie Webster and Ashton Conroy: Baby Baby
Mamie Ree & Young Wolf with the Gus Jenkins Band: Caught
Rev. J.M. Gates: These Hard Times
Soul Stirrers: Why I Like Roosevelt Pt. 1
Soul Stirrers: Why I Like Roosevelt Pt. 2
Jimmie Lunceford and His Chickasaw Syncopators: In Dat Mornin´
Famous Hokum Boys: Terrible Operation Blues
Dirty Red: Mother Fuyer
Butterbeans: Hello, Sue
Dan Pickett: Number Writer
Harmonica Frank Floyd: Swamp Root
Champion Jack Dupree: Slow Boogie
Red Saunders with Dolores Hawkins and The Hambone Kids: Hambone
Slim Gaillard Trio: Puerto Vootie
Dr. Jo Jo Adams with Maxwell Davis All Stars: When I´m In My Tea
Big Jay McNeely: Road House Boogie
William "Thunderbird" Walker: Thunderbird
The Treniers: Uh Oh (Get Out Of The Car)
Brother Woodman & The Chanters featuring Ethel Brown: Hot Mama
Little Caesar: You Can´t Bring Me Down
Little Caesar: Goodbye Baby
Vernon Green and The Medallions: The Letter
The Shaweez: No One To Love Me
Joe Hill Louis- One Man Band: Gotta Let You Go
Willie Nix and His Combo: Just Can´t Say
Richard Berry: The Big Break